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Developing A Personal Accountability Plan

by Roger Connors on December 22nd, 2009
Amid the hustle and bustle of gift giving, holiday celebrations with family and friends, and a few occasional moments of rest and relaxation, most of us inevitably find ourselves reflecting on the past year while anticipating the year to come. In the spirit of new year’s resolutions, that really work, we recommend developing a Personal Accountability Plan that includes: 1) the key results you want to achieve next year, 2) how you’ll use the Steps to Accountability—See It, Own It, Solve It, and Do It—to deliver those results, and, 3) an Accountability Partner with whom you can share feedback, progress, and follow-up. Here’s one person’s story of how a Personal Accountability Plan can make a big impact on your life and the year(s) ahead.
Three years ago, Amber Riviere’s Personal Accountability Plan included finding an Accountability Partner who could help her stay on track toward achieving the results she wanted. Today, she’s delighted with her progress, “January marks three years that HYPERLINK “http://www.marriedwithluggage.com/”my accountability partner and I have been meeting, and I cannot say enough about how much it has improved my business … I’m more focused … I stay the course … I’m more honest and real … I make greater progress in less time … I concentrate more on results … I’m less likely to get stuck in ruts … and I’m more balanced.”
For those of you who would like to begin developing a Personal Accountability Plan for 2010, we suggest you begin by answering the questions below:
Key Results—Recognize that Accountability begins with well-defined results. What are the Key Results you want to deliver in 2010? (We recommend focusing on 3 Key Results.)  How well do you understand the Key Results you are accountable to deliver? How well do your partners or members of your team know and understand these Key Results? Can you identify the process that will allow you and your partners/team to stay current and on track with respect to each of the Key Results?
Steps to Accountability—Apply the Steps to Accountability to address obstacles, increase ownership, build resolve, and make it happen. What will you do to obtain the perspectives of others, in order to more quickly and effectively “See It?” How will you become more personally invested in achieving your Key Results? What will you do to keep asking yourself, “What else can I do?” How will you keep yourself focused on the top priorities relating to your Key Results? What will you do to avoid blaming other people or external circumstances for any lack of progress?  Learn more about the Steps to Accountability by visiting www.ozprinciple.com.
Accountability Partner—Find an Accountability Partner (boss, associate, friend, life partner, therapist, relative), with whom you share mutual respect and trust. Who is willing to give you honest feedback and on-going encouragement to help you stay on track, overcome obstacles, and deliver your Key Results in the coming year? How can you enlist this person to help you become even more accountable to yourself and your commitment to deliver Key Results? What will you do to help your Accountability Partner in return?
After 20 years of working with individuals and organizations to help them become more accountable, we have learned that Personal Accountability Plans work wonders—if they’re internalized and integrated into daily activities. Accountability is a personal choice, one day at a time. Have a  Merry Christmas and an Accountable New Year!

Amid the hustle and bustle of gift giving, holiday celebrations with family and friends, and a few occasional moments of rest and relaxation, most of us inevitably find ourselves reflecting on the past year while anticipating the year to come. In the spirit of new year’s resolutions, that really work, we recommend developing a Personal Accountability Plan that includes: 1) the key results you want to achieve next year, 2) how you’ll use the Steps to Accountability—See It, Own It, Solve It, and Do It—to deliver those results, and, 3) an Accountability Partner with whom you can share feedback, progress, and follow-up. Here’s one person’s story of how a Personal Accountability Plan can make a big impact on your life and the year(s) ahead.

Three years ago, Amber Riviere’s Personal Accountability Plan included finding an Accountability Partner who could help her stay on track toward achieving the results she wanted. Today, she’s delighted with her progress, “January marks three years that my accountability partner and I have been meeting, and I cannot say enough about how much it has improved my business … I’m more focused … I stay the course … I’m more honest and real … I make greater progress in less time … I concentrate more on results … I’m less likely to get stuck in ruts … and I’m more balanced.”

For those of you who would like to begin developing a Personal Accountability Plan for 2010, we suggest you begin by answering the questions below:

Key Results—Recognize that Accountability begins with well-defined results. What are the Key Results you want to deliver in 2010? (We recommend focusing on 3 Key Results.)  How well do you understand the Key Results you are accountable to deliver? How well do your partners or members of your team know and understand these Key Results? Can you identify the process that will allow you and your partners/team to stay current and on track with respect to each of the Key Results?

Steps to Accountability—Apply the Steps to Accountability to address obstacles, increase ownership, build resolve, and make it happen. What will you do to obtain the perspectives of others, in order to more quickly and effectively “See It?” How will you become more personally invested in achieving your Key Results? What will you do to keep asking yourself, “What else can I do?” How will you keep yourself focused on the top priorities relating to your Key Results? What will you do to avoid blaming other people or external circumstances for any lack of progress?  Learn more about the Steps to Accountability by visiting www.ozprinciple.com.

Accountability Partner—Find an Accountability Partner (boss, associate, friend, spouse, therapist, relative), with whom you share mutual respect and trust. Who is willing to give you honest feedback and on-going encouragement to help you stay on track, overcome obstacles, and deliver your Key Results in the coming year? How can you enlist this person to help you become even more accountable to yourself and your commitment to deliver Key Results? What will you do to help your Accountability Partner in return?

After 20 years of working with individuals and organizations to help them become more accountable, we have learned that Personal Accountability Plans work wonders—if they’re internalized and integrated into daily activities. Accountability is a personal choice, one day at a time. Have a  Merry Christmas and an Accountable New Year!

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One Comment
  1. GERARD G. GERALE permalink

    How can i maintain personal accountability when all my hustles are up to limits?

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