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Feb 27 15

Getting Accountability Right

by The Authors
Accountability is the Recipe for Success

If you don’t get accountability right, you’ll have difficulty getting anything else right. Creating accountability the wrong way only leads to what we call the Accountability Paradox: actually getting less accountability when you’re trying to create more. Accountability done right, on the other hand, is an accelerator of change and improvement. It becomes the key to your ability to execute on any and all important initiatives—efforts to improve top-line revenue, bottom-line growth, customer satisfaction, employee engagement, and other areas of strategic focus unique to your organization. Consider the following example of how greater personal and organizational accountability led to crucial and sustainable improvements in performance and results.

After experiencing a substantial decline in profitability, a well-known hospitality business began a journey to build greater accountability and alignment for delivering needed performance and results throughout the organization. Following one of the events where Accountability Training and culture change had been the primary focus, one senior leader described how far they’d come in a relatively short period of time: “We were experts [when we started this journey] at ‘The Blame Game’ and sought out a library of reasons as to why our performance was not optimal. Holding others and ourselves accountable for results and actions was not something that was prevalent in our organization. The laser focus on ‘accountability’ provided in various events has helped us get back on the right track.” In a few short months, the company was not only able to significantly improve performance but to also restore $40 million in profitability. Today, that company continues to operate at higher levels of performance and results than its competitors.

Every effort to improve performance and results can be accelerated and facilitated by establishing a foundation of personal and organizational accountability. Furthermore, without such a foundation, performance improvements and result achievements often turn out to be unsatisfactory and unsustainable.

To learn more about how to create a Culture of Accountability in your team and at every level of your organization, we invite you to join the Accountability Community at www.ozprinciple.com, where you can review actual client case studies.

Sign up for one of our upcoming webinars to learn how you can use accountability to become an even stronger leader.

Accountability Training, Culture of Accountability, and Accountability Community are registered trademarks of Partners In Leadership, Inc. All other registered trademarks and trademarks used herein are the property of their respective owners.

Feb 19 15

How Valuable is Feedback?

by The Authors
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Over the past two decades, we have implemented feedback processes in thousands of organizations with millions of people at every organizational level in countries around the world. The experience has taught us invaluable lessons about the extraordinary power associated with the giving and receiving of feedback. Here are a few of them:

Feedback doesn’t happen unless you make it happen.
It’s easier to filter feedback than it is to accept it.
People don’t usually act on feedback without some sort of follow-up.
Feedback declines after people improve because they inevitably assume it’s no longer necessary.
Organizations underestimate the difficulty involved in getting people to give and receive feedback.
People appreciate the feedback they receive only after they have applied it and seen its impact on their results.

When we regularly seek and offer feedback with the intent to improve individual and organizational performance, we not only demonstrate genuine respect for each other, but we also achieve consistently better results. That’s the value of feedback.

Most successful leaders realize that honest feedback—received and given, appreciative and constructive—is essential to sustainable success. So why don’t leaders and managers exchange feedback more often? One business leader, determined to change his organization’s culture, began asking his direct reports whether they thought seeking or giving feedback to someone else was effective. Then he ask them whether they thought going around someone to his or her boss or going to a peer in hope that he or she would say something to someone else was effective.  Finally, he asked them whether they thought not telling the truth or not hearing the truth, as someone else sees it, was effective. Within a few months, his direct reports got the message and started exchanging feedback more honestly and more frequently. And, yes, the culture of the team and the organization changed for the better.

To learn more about how feedback can help you create a Culture of Accountability for achieving desired results in your organization, we invite you to join the Accountability Community at www.partnersinleadership.com, where you can review actual client case studies.

Sign up for one of our upcoming webinars to learn how you can use accountability to become an even stronger leader.

Culture of Accountability and Accountability Community are registered trademarks of Partners In Leadership, Inc. All other registered trademarks and trademarks used herein are the property of their respective owners.

 

Feb 12 15

Organic Culture Change

by The Authors
Make Sure Your Team is Above the Line.

Where do the best organizational solutions, innovations, improvements, and breakthroughs come from? Wise leaders know that these things don’t come from themselves; they come from the people on the floor, in the field, and across the organization by virtue of their day-to-day working knowledge of the organization’s issues, problems, needs, and realities. In a recent conversation with one of our global clients, the CEO summarized his reality this way: “Whenever our people come up with new customer solutions, improved business processes, or better ways of developing talent, they are changing the culture to keep it aligned with the results we need to achieve. My primary job as a leader is to make sure our people are staying Above the Line and focusing on the right results. They do the rest.”

Everyone in an organization, regardless of position or role, has the daily opportunity to change the organization’s culture. Yes, everyone can influence and change an organization’s culture.

When people throughout an organization take accountability for making the necessary changes to keep the organizational culture working for them, not against them, they always produce dramatic, sustainable results. That’s what we’ve learned over the past two decades of providing Accountability Training and culture change services to thousands of organizations worldwide. Above the Line employees (i.e., people who are actively and consistently taking accountability for achieving results) are much more likely to suggest or develop new ways of thinking and acting that result in improved products, enhanced customer service, streamlined business processes, reduced costs, increased sales, and strengthen colleagues—all of which shape the organization’s culture. Gallup’s research on employee engagement shows the same thing: engaged employees (demonstrated by taking accountability for results) are always better problem solvers, innovators, and agents of change. Business leaders who want to take their organizations to new heights must get better at developing greater accountability in their people for organic culture change and, when necessary, even radical culture change, so they can deliver better results. Remember, culture changes one person at a time and accountable people are always your best culture change agents.

For more information on accountability, culture change, and building a Culture of Accountability, we invite you to join the Accountability Community at www.partnersinleadership.com, where you can review actual client case studies.

Sign up for one of our upcoming webinars to learn how you can use accountability to become an even stronger leader.

Above the Line, Accountability Training, Culture of Accountability, and Accountability Community are all registered trademarks of Partners In Leadership, Inc. All other registered trademarks and trademarks used herein are the property of their respective owners.