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Jun 19 15

Removing Barriers

by The Authors
Executive Coaching

Most people in organizations regularly encounter barriers that are difficult to overcome or eliminate. Why? Because too many people in organizations fail to take accountability for removing such barriers. Whenever your customers, employees, suppliers, or other stakeholders experience frustration and disengagement because of organizational barriers, it is a clear sign that some of your organization’s policies, procedures, or processes have become hindrances—rather than enablers—to achieving your organization’s desired results. Taking accountability for overcoming or eliminating any and all barriers that impede performance and the achievement of Key Results is crucial for success in today’s business environment.

Apple Computer is a company that exemplifies taking accountability for removing barriers, hence the company’s amazing market value. iPhone, iPad, iPod, and iWatch users worldwide have downloaded billions of apps from Apple’s revolutionary App Store. How do they keep it going? Apple vigilantly removes barriers for developers, users, and their own employees everyday. Arguably, the App Store experience, like the Apple Store experience, is unlike anything else offered by competitors.

To vigilantly overcome or eliminate barriers to success, Apple is constantly developing and improving tools such as iOS SDK, which allows millions of independent app developers to immediately begin developing applications for iPad, iPhone, and iPod touch. Apple’s Dev Center also provides a wealth of resources—such as videos, sample code, technical documentation, and Apple Developer Forums—to facilitate and accelerate app development. There are thousands of inspiring app developer testimonials online that tell the story. Removing barriers for customers, independent developers, employees, and all other stakeholders is paramount for sustaining high levels of performance and success at Apple. Today iPhone, iPad, iPod, and iWatch customers in more than 80 countries worldwide can choose from an incredible range of apps in dozens of categories, including entertainment, business, medical, news, sports, reference, and travel.

To learn more about how to take greater accountability for removing barriers in your organization, we invite you to join the Accountability Community at www.ozprinciple.com, where you can review actual client case studies.

Sign up for one of our upcoming webinars to learn more about how to remove barriers by Creating A Culture Of Accountability.

Accountability Community and Creating A Culture Of Accountability are registered trademarks of Partners In Leadership, Inc. All other registered trademarks and trademarks used herein are the property of their respective owners.

Jun 12 15

Key Expectations—Clear and Aligned?

by The Authors
solve-it

When it comes to Key Expectations that absolutely must be met (i.e., no excuse deliverables), nothing but “crystal clear and aligned” will do. For some people, forming “crystal clear and aligned” expectations may be easy, but for most of us, it’s not. Generally, we do an “okay” job of letting people know what we expect of them. When it’s really important, we often do a “better” job by working harder to make sure people know what we expect. However, doing “better” than “okay” is usually not enough to deliver the results we want.

The work of forming “crystal clear and aligned” expectations begins with becoming much more conscious and deliberate about the process. First and foremost, the expectation must be formed in a way that makes the deliverable clearly understood by all involved. Managers and leaders can always form expectations on their own, but “crystal clear and aligned” expectations are always formed through collaboration with those involved in making it happen. Only mutually understood and agreed upon expectations can get people fully committed to getting the job done. So, how are you doing when it comes to forming “crystal clear and aligned” expectations? Answer “Yes” or “No” to the following questions to find out.

Do you wonder why the people you depend on just don’t seem to get it?
Are you often disappointed with the results people deliver and routinely ask the question, “How did that happen?”
Do your people sometimes feel that they waste time working on things you ask them to do because your priorities keep changing?
Are the people you work closest with unable to articulate what is most important to you with any degree of clarity or certainty?
Do you tend to understate what you are really asking people to do because you don’t want to strain relationships?
Do you assume your people already have the vision of what needs to be done and, as a result, you don’t take the needed time to form specific expectations?
Are you frequently re-explaining or further clarifying what it is you really want?

If you replied “Yes” to one or more of the above statements, there is room for improvement. For more information about clearly forming your expectations so that everyone you depend upon understands exactly what needs to happen, we invite you to join the Accountability Community by visiting www.ozprinciple.com, where you can review actual client case studies.

Sign up for one of our upcoming webinars to learn more about forming crystal clear and aligned Key Expectations.

Key Expectations and Accountability Community are all registered trademarks of Partners In Leadership, Inc. All other registered trademarks and trademarks used herein are the property of their respective owners.

Jun 5 15

Creating A Culture Of Accountability

by The Authors
Culture of Accountability

Two mothers in Southern California assumed they would be able to find lots of organic baby food alternatives for their newborns. They were wrong. Despite the growing demand for natural organic ingredients in food, these mothers could not find the baby food alternatives they wanted, so they decided to take accountability for their situation by asking themselves, “What else can we do?” You guessed it. They started making their own organic purees for their babies. Word began to spread along with their range of organic baby food creations.

Seeing the market need and opportunity, they decided to take ownership for filling the underserved market niche for natural organic baby food. One mother was a local TV reporter and the other was a former chef at one of Wolfgang Puck’s restaurants. Combining their training and experience, they launched a new business. Today their baby food products are sold under the name Tasty Brand at a number of chains, including Whole Foods, Albertson’s, and Costco, and online at Amazon.com. Their Culture of Accountability, which began with just the two of them, has now grown into a thriving business that is profitable, expanding, and serving the needs not only of families who have babies but people everywhere: “Offer people something that puts a big smile on their faces, but that doesn’t contain any ‘junk,’ like high-fructose corn syrup, artificial colors & flavors, etc.  We’re big believers in choosing organic and non-GMO verified products because what you eat really matters! Originally, we had kids in mind, but we quickly realized that Tasty Brand is for everyone!  After all, who doesn’t like gummies & cookies? So, go ahead … treat yourself to TASTY!”

At the core of every Culture of Accountability are people voluntarily assuming accountability for achieving their desired results. Accountability is never forced upon them. Instead, they take it upon themselves freely and enthusiastically. Driven by the mantra “What else can I do to achieve the desired results?” they continually search for new solutions. Think of the number of times this sort of accountability has led to amazing business start-ups just like Tasty Brand.

To learn more about how to create a Culture of Accountability in your team, business, or organization, join our Accountability Community at www.ozprinciple.com, where you can review actual client case studies.

Sign up for one of our upcoming webinars to learn more about the importance of accountability.

Accountability Community, Creating A Culture Of Accountability, and Culture of Accountability are all registered trademarks of Partners In Leadership, Inc. All other registered trademarks and trademarks used herein are the property of their respective owners.