Skip to content
May 28 15

What else can you do . . . today?

by The Authors
A

The Solve It question “What else can I do to achieve the desired results?” is clearly an action-oriented question that is built upon our ability to See It and Own It and sets us up to Do It. So here are a few Solve It tips for turning your understanding and ownership into real problem-solving action.

  1. Stay engaged. Never focus on what you can’t do; instead, look for solutions that you can do.
  2. Always ask the Solve It question “What else can I do?”
  3. Think differently. Remember, the same thinking that got you into a problem won’t get you out of it.
  4. Create new linkages. New approaches usually involve building new relationships.
  5. Take the initiative. Be the person you want to be—someone who makes things happen.
  6. Step out of your comfort zone. Challenge your current assumptions and beliefs in order to break through to new levels of thinking.

Consider the following example about what happens when we continually ask the Solve It question “What else can I do?” The call centers of a large financial services company were struggling to improve. Turnover was high, “handle time” was long, and software solutions were inadequate. Targets for improvement were established, and everyone began asking the question “What else can I do?” However, when it came to bringing about real change in terms of performance improvement, the going got tougher as numerous unexpected issues and problems arose. Undaunted, everyone in the organization continued to ask “What else can I do?” as they looked for solutions. Ideas poured in from everywhere as everyone from senior management to telephone operators took accountability for reducing the time needed to handle a call.

Within a few months, they changed the way they hired people, they implemented new software solutions, they began measuring and reporting performance on a daily basis, they implemented a balanced scorecard, and they focused their training and development on high priority skills. Their Solve It mentality flourished, leading to a new set of Solve It skills. The result was a whopping $143 million per year increase in net operating income.

Accepting reality and owning circumstances will accomplish little if you fail to solve problems and remove obstacles on your road to results. Once you See It and Own It, you must Solve It by constantly asking “What else can I do to achieve the desired results?” Only then can you consistently Do It!

To learn more about asking the Solve It question “What else can I do?” and developing crucial Solve It skills, we invite you to join the Accountability Community at www.ozprinciple.com, where you can review actual client case studies.

Sign up for one of our upcoming webinars to learn more about using the steps of accountability to achieve results.

Accountability Community, See It, Own It, Solve It, and Do It are all registered trademarks of Partners In Leadership, Inc. All other registered trademarks and trademarks used herein are the property of their respective owners.

 

 

 

May 21 15

R-E-S-P-E-C-T

by The Authors
Employee Engagement

Companies on Fortune’s most admired company list are certainly not perfect, but most of them work very hard to make respect for others a top priority. In fact, many of them cultivate profound respect for individuals as well as heartfelt accountability for demonstrating respect for others on a daily basis. The branded products and services of these companies are intended to produce superior quality and value for their customers. This in turn requires their leaders and employees to take accountability for demonstrating beliefs and values such as: (1) showing respect for all individuals, (2) combining the interests of the company and the individual, (3) focusing work strategically to maximize engagement and productivity, (4) encouraging innovation as a cornerstone of success, (5) valuing personal mastery and individual growth, and (6) embracing mutual interdependency as a way of organizational life.

How’s the respect level on your team and in your organization? Are there people on your team or inside your organization that don’t receive the respect they deserve? Are there people outside your team or organization—customers, suppliers, cross-functional teams and partners, vendors, communities, or other stakeholders—that likewise fail to receive respect from your organization? If so, why? How often? What about the people who report directly to you? Are any of them respected more than others? If so, why? Are you respected by your peers and the other leaders in your organization? When did you last feel seriously disrespected? What did you do about it?

One of the important benefits of taking accountability for respecting individuals and their individuality is an unusually high level of trust that facilitates astonishingly open and candid discussions about mistakes, learning, failures, and how to foster continuous improvement. Think about it. Do you See It—i.e., do you see the level of respect you want and need in your team and organization?

To better Own It, learn more about how to build greater accountability for respecting individuals and individuality in your team and organization. To do so, we invite you to join the Accountability Community at www.partnersinleadership.com, where you can review actual client case studies.

Sign up for one of our upcoming webinars to learn more about the results of accountability in the workplace.

See It, Own It, and Accountability Community are all registered trademarks of Partners In Leadership, Inc. All other registered trademarks and trademarks used herein are the property of their respective owners.

 

May 15 15

Connecting the Dots to What Matters Most

by The Authors
Increase Employee Engagement

When employees don’t make a clear connection between performing their daily work and advancing the cause of the organization, they become less invested in the organization’s purpose and priorities. Eventually they become either passively or actively disengaged in their work. Reengaging them is first and foremost about helping them reconnect the dots between what they think and do everyday and what the organization needs them to think and do everyday to achieve the desired organizational results. If they can’t connect the dots, they won’t engage.

Our research shows that only 32% of people in organizations link what they do on a daily basis to their organization’s Key Results—the results that matter most to the organization in terms of crucial outcomes. Moreover, 74% percent of business leaders feel that their organization’s Key Results are not clearly understood or actively pursued throughout the organization.

To increase employee engagement, begin by clarifying the results your employees need to achieve as a team or organization. Then make your best case for why people should sign up, buy in, and invest in getting it done. In the end, employee engagement is about harnessing the power of individuals and teams within the organization to get things done. When people in organizations are actively engaged in tying what they think and do every day to the organization’s Key Results, they develop a deeper sense of personal accountability and ownership for the success of their team and organization. They also bring to bear a whole new level of creative thinking as they devise solutions that may never have occurred to them or to you. In fact, highly engaged employees go beyond the basic requirements of their jobs and often make things happen in ways that surpasses our wildest expectations.

To learn more about how Partners In Leadership’s Accountability Training and Culture Change services can help employees connect the dots between what they do everyday and what matters most to the organization, we invite you to join the Accountability Community at www.partnersinleadership.com, where you can review actual client case studies that illustrate the impact of employee engagement on organizational results.

Sign up for one of our upcoming webinars to learn more about increasing employee engagement.

Accountability Training and Accountability Community are all registered trademarks of Partners In Leadership, Inc. All other registered trademarks and trademarks used herein are the property of their respective owners.