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Jul 30 15

Making Accountability Stick

by The Authors
Learning and Training

We often hear this question: “How do you make Accountability Training stick?” Or we hear this longer version: “We’ve tried repeatedly over the years to get our people to take more accountability for their behavior and results, but we haven’t been able to make it stick . . . how do you make it stick?”

Not surprisingly, there are a number of critical success factors when it comes to making accountability stick—such as a common language and framework for discussing accountability, a crystal-clear definition of desired results, personal choice and commitment, positive rather than negative applications of accountability, proven implementation tools and skills, and determined follow-up—but the real secret to making accountability “sticky” is integration. Taking accountability has to become part of the DNA of your leaders, your people, and your entire organization. It needs to be woven continuously into daily activities and always tied to your organization’s Key Results.

It was for this very reason and purpose that we developed the simple, basic, and easy-to-implement Steps to Accountability—See It, Own It, Solve It, Do It—including cogent descriptions of Above The Line and Below The Line behavior and attitudes. This is the central model of The Oz Principle and the primary vehicle or method for making accountability stick. When people in organizations begin using the language of Above The Line and Below The Line and See It, Own It, Solve It, Do It on a daily basis, they start building a common awareness and commitment around staying Above The Line and Seeing It, Owning It, Solving It, and Doing It. What emerges from such awareness and commitment is a whole new approach to work and results. People begin monitoring and correcting themselves while encouraging and helping others to stay Above The Line in order to achieve the desired results. Consequently, accountability becomes internalized in every individual and integrated into every activity. When people begin weaving Above The Line, Below The Line, and See It, Own It, Solve It, Do It language into their daily work activities, they take a crucial first step toward building a Culture of Accountability and creating a work environment where people take accountability for getting results.

For more information on making accountability stick and creating a Culture of Accountability, we invite you to join the Accountability Community at www.ozprinciple.com, where you can review actual client case studies.

Sign up for one of our upcoming webinars to learn more about how you can make accountability stick.

Above The Line; Accountability Community; Accountability Training; Below The Line; Culture of Accountability; See It, Own It, Solve It, Do It; and Steps To Accountability are registered trademarks of Partners In Leadership, Inc. All other registered trademarks and trademarks used herein are the property of their respective owners.

Jul 10 15

Overcoming Organizational Hurdles

by The Authors
Overcoming Obstacles

Overcoming organizational hurdles that impede performance, creativity, communication, and problem solving is crucial to success in today’s business environment, but it often occurs too slowly and infrequently. Most people in today’s organizations regularly encounter organizational barriers that are extremely difficult to overcome or eliminate. The truth is that many organizations do everything possible to hold onto their rules, policies, procedures, processes, and systems as long as possible. Only when such organizational ways and means are shown to be obviously faulty, obsolete, or failing are they changed—and, even then, with great resistance.

Of course, all organizational rules, policies, procedures, processes, and systems are instituted to address specific needs and circumstances—the problem is that needs and circumstances change weekly, even daily. At eBay there are no barriers to accomplishing anything and everything necessary to grow the company’s robust trading network. eBay has 160 million active users, many of whom earn their living off the site and are a creative, demanding crowd who don’t want to be stopped from achieving their desired results. Early in the company’s development, after a systems crash that nearly swamped the start-up firm, then CEO Meg Whitman hired Maynard Webb away from Gateway; she paid him more than twice her own salary and gave him an open road to building a system infrastructure that now handles over a billion transactions per day. Of course, the system has continued to advance.

Keeping your organizational culture and infrastructure flexible and easily adaptable are the new key success factors. Don’t let your people experience frustration, anger, and disengagement over organizational barriers—whenever they do, it is a clear sign that some of your organization’s rules, policies, procedures, processes or systems have hindered, rather than assisted, in achieving the organization’s desired results.

To learn more about how to create organizational cultures and infrastructures that remain dynamic and viable, join our Accountability Community at www.ozprinciple.com, where you can review the accounts of actual companies.

Sign up for one of our upcoming webinars to learn more about overcoming organizational hurdles.

Accountability Community is a registered trademark of Partners In Leadership, Inc. All other registered trademarks and trademarks used herein are the property of their respective owners.

Jun 19 15

Removing Barriers

by The Authors
Executive Coaching

Most people in organizations regularly encounter barriers that are difficult to overcome or eliminate. Why? Because too many people in organizations fail to take accountability for removing such barriers. Whenever your customers, employees, suppliers, or other stakeholders experience frustration and disengagement because of organizational barriers, it is a clear sign that some of your organization’s policies, procedures, or processes have become hindrances—rather than enablers—to achieving your organization’s desired results. Taking accountability for overcoming or eliminating any and all barriers that impede performance and the achievement of Key Results is crucial for success in today’s business environment.

Apple Computer is a company that exemplifies taking accountability for removing barriers, hence the company’s amazing market value. iPhone, iPad, iPod, and iWatch users worldwide have downloaded billions of apps from Apple’s revolutionary App Store. How do they keep it going? Apple vigilantly removes barriers for developers, users, and their own employees everyday. Arguably, the App Store experience, like the Apple Store experience, is unlike anything else offered by competitors.

To vigilantly overcome or eliminate barriers to success, Apple is constantly developing and improving tools such as iOS SDK, which allows millions of independent app developers to immediately begin developing applications for iPad, iPhone, and iPod touch. Apple’s Dev Center also provides a wealth of resources—such as videos, sample code, technical documentation, and Apple Developer Forums—to facilitate and accelerate app development. There are thousands of inspiring app developer testimonials online that tell the story. Removing barriers for customers, independent developers, employees, and all other stakeholders is paramount for sustaining high levels of performance and success at Apple. Today iPhone, iPad, iPod, and iWatch customers in more than 80 countries worldwide can choose from an incredible range of apps in dozens of categories, including entertainment, business, medical, news, sports, reference, and travel.

To learn more about how to take greater accountability for removing barriers in your organization, we invite you to join the Accountability Community at www.ozprinciple.com, where you can review actual client case studies.

Sign up for one of our upcoming webinars to learn more about how to remove barriers by Creating A Culture Of Accountability.

Accountability Community and Creating A Culture Of Accountability are registered trademarks of Partners In Leadership, Inc. All other registered trademarks and trademarks used herein are the property of their respective owners.