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Sep 10 15

Closing Accountability Gaps

by The Authors
Team closing gaps

Accountability Gaps are performance setbacks that directly affect an organization’s ability to achieve their Key Results. They are the difference between what is actually occurring and what you want to occur. We call them Accountability Gaps to emphasize the need to take accountability to close the gap before achievement of a Key Result is jeopardized. Whenever you identify an Accountability Gap, STOP. That’s right, STOP and apply the Steps To Accountability—See It, Own It, Solve It, Do It—to begin closing the gap. Consider the following example.

A large fast food chain recently identified an Accountability Gap relative to results in one of its geographical regions. Leaders of the region STOPPED and applied the Steps To Accountability to See It, Own It, Solve It, and Do It—we refer to this as an application of the SOSD Accountability Tool. New staffing configurations, briefing huddles prior to peak demand periods, and a compelling mantra to “Own the Gap” were quickly implemented to close the gap. Within weeks, the region’s results were on the rise. Within months, the gap had been closed. This sort of focus on Accountability Gaps, quickly and effectively applied, can work wonders in an organization. All you need to do is STOP and follow four easy steps: (1) Identify the Accountability Gap, (2) Apply the Steps To Accountability, (3) Make your Accountability Plan, and (4) Report your plan.

To learn more about closing Accountability Gaps on your team or in your organization by applying the Steps To Accountability, we invite you to join our Accountability Community at www.ozprinciple.com, where you can review the stories and case studies of actual people and organizations.

Sign up for one of our upcoming webinars to learn how to more effectively close Accountability Gaps.

Accountability Community®; Accountability Gap; Do It®; Own It®; See It®; See It, Own It, Solve It, Do It®; Solve It®; SOSD; Steps To Accountability® are registered trademarks of Partners In Leadership, Inc. All other registered trademarks and trademarks used herein are the property of their respective owners.

Sep 3 15

Growing Sales — The Old Fashioned Way

by The Authors
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Companies in every industry and geographical location around the globe continue to learn and relearn this basic lesson: if you want to grow sales, you have to build greater accountability in the sales force. When taking accountability for sales growth climbs, the sales results follow: 1) increased sales volume and margins, 2) improved product and service launches, 3) better coaching, feedback and follow-through, 4) greater ownership of customer end results, and 5) more energized sales teams. Here’s how one successful sales executive described his experience after building greater accountability in one of his sales teams several years ago:

Of the ten people on that team, nine of the reps were promoted to district manager within a two-year period, and our district manager began his climb from district sales manager to regional to cross-functional teams all the way to vice president of sales and marketing. Years later, several members of that original team moved into regional or national account leadership. Today, you can find these people in other companies as executive vice presidents and senior leaders.

In another case, a provider of wireless services began applying basic accountability principles throughout its sales organization in an effort to bring immediate sales growth. Sales increased 17% in the following quarter, profit margins increased 45% over the next several months, and customer satisfaction scores soared. Building greater accountability in the sales force consistently results in sales growth for many Fortune 1000 companies.

To learn more about how sales reps, sales teams and sales organizations can apply basic accountability principles to grow sales, improve leadership and achieve other key milestones and results, we invite you to join the Accountability Community at www.ozprinciple.com, where you can review actual client case studies in detail.

Sign up for one of our upcoming webinars to learn how to create greater accountability in the sales force.

Accountability Community is registered trademark of Partners In Leadership, Inc. All other registered trademarks and trademarks used herein are the property of their respective owners.

Aug 27 15

Culture of Accountability

by The Authors
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Working in a Culture of Accountability creates a strong sense of what we call “organizational health and integrity.” It is the collective version of individual health and integrity where “I will do what I say I will do” becomes “We will do what we say we will do.” When people do everything in their power to do what they say they will do, rather than talk and complain, work becomes predictable and commitments become reality.

How often do you hear people in your organization ask questions and make comments such as “Why can’t people do what they say they’ll do?” “Why can’t people stay focused on what matters most?” “What makes people so political and turf-oriented in this organization?” “How do they expect us to keep up with their changing priorities?” “We talk and talk about the same old issues, but nothing ever changes.” “Nobody walks the talk around here.” In reality, such questions and comments are pretty typical in organizations today, so this is why people in organizations develop a heightened awareness of inconsistencies, contradictions, and hypocrisy. Organizations and leaders that do not address these accountability issues can expect to pay a huge price for their inattention: unmet expecta­tions and undelivered results throughout the organization.

Only when leaders and organizations are serious about creating a Culture of Accountability can they permanently move from talking about inconsistencies, contradictions, and hypocrisy to doing something about them. How do you make that happen? You do it by “Follow Through,” “Get Real,” and “Speak Up.” Follow Through means to do what you say you will do, Get Real means to get to the truth, and Speak Up means to say what needs to be said. No team or organization can expect to develop true account­ability or a Culture of Accountability without these values and their associated actions.

To learn more about how to create a Culture of Accountability in your workplace—where people Follow Through, Get Real, and Speak Up—we invite you to join the Accountability Community at www.ozprinciple.com, where you can review the stories of organizations that have actually done it.

Sign up for one of our upcoming webinars to learn how to create a Culture of Accountability in your organization.

Accountability Community and Culture of Accountability are registered trademarks of Partners In Leadership, Inc. All other registered trademarks and trademarks used herein are the property of their respective owners.